Saturday, April 13, 2013

Matza Brei

Obviously I had my matza brei on Pesach (Passover) but I was so out of the blogging loop that I forgot to take photos of it. Can you believe that!?

Before leaving Jerusalem for London, I had had to buy a packet of matzas for DD's mock seder at kindergarten. Also, I rented out the apartment here during Pesach. So when we returned there was fair amount of leftover matza in the cupboard. I managed to get through most of it with butter and/or cheese. Maybe one or two with butter and jam. And then I was down to the last three slices. I took the opportunity to return to matza brei so that I could share it with you because it's one of life's pure pleasures and, for many of us, the ultimate comfort food.

Matza Brei

Ingredients
Slices of matza (the big ones)
water
one egg per slice of matza
a splash of milk
salt and pepper
a generous knob butter for frying

Method
1. Run your matza under the tap for 3 seconds to wet them but don't make them soggy.
2. Beat the eggs, milk, salt and pepper in a bowl (like for making an omelet).
3. Melt the butter in a frying pan.
4. Break the matza up over the pan and drop the pieces into the hot butter. Stir and fry over for a minute. You may have to add lots more butter.
5. Pour over the egg mixture and cook like scrambled eggs.
6. Turn out onto a plate and add more salt and pepper to taste.

Variation
There are those who prefer their matza brei made like an omelet and they may even season it with sugar like a pancake. Others can't resist adding fried mushrooms or onions to the mixture but, imo, you can't improve on the basic pure matza brei. I would advise you not to play with the recipe.

Warning
Everyone has their own family matza brei made to Grandma's traditional recipe. Everyone thinks that theirs is the best and the original. Don't get drawn into arguments about this - keep your cool and be secure in the knowledge that mine is the best and the original.

Invitation
I invite those with different matza brei experiences to add them in the comments below.

14 comments:

  1. Glad you're back. Wondered why I'd had no blog alerts for ages!

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    1. Thank you. It's good to take a break once in a while but I'm glad I was missed.

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  2. Sounds delicious but, what are matza breis? Are they a type of bread? Liks pitta maybe?

    Welcome back, hope you had a lovely break :-)

    xx Jazzy

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    1. Brei or breit is German (or maybe Yiddish) for fry. It literally means fried matza. Matza are the large matza crackers you can find in the supermarkets. Rakusens are the most well-known brand.

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    2. Welcome back and very pleased to hear you were too busy having a good time to take blog photos. Mmmmm you are so right that matza brei is a pure pleasure, I love it in all its disguises but yours does look the best ;-)

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    3. You're too kind MumB, I bet you make a mean matza brei. :)

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    4. I'm your German reader and "Brei" is the German word for mush :-)

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    5. Ah, matza mush - that's a very good description. Thank you for that. :)

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  3. Ah man. That's just pure comfort.

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  4. Something different. Fab. Commenting for BritMums

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    Replies
    1. I look forward to reading your blog post about it when you make it at home :~).

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  5. To qualify for competition you need to add the badge and link as per the terms and conditions
    link to the Main Meals in Minutes site http://www.eggrecipes.co.uk/mainmealsinminutes.

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    Replies
    1. I don't think I'm eligible to enter the competition as I am not a UK resident, that's why I didn't add the badge and do all the linking. Thanks anyway.

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